Future Artist Maker Labs: The Exhibition

Sat 26 Nov 10:00am to Sun 26 Feb 6:00pm
Free

Venue: Nerve Visual Gallery, Ebrington 

Tuesday - Saturday : 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday : 12:00 - 18:00
Mondays : Closed

From the printing press to colour photography to powerful laser cutters, the creativity of each generation’s artist-makers evolves in relation to new technologies.

Future Artist-Makers: The Exhibition explores how today’s artist- makers are embracing the latest digital fabrication tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, and CNC routers, to imagine, design and create artworks that otherwise might not be possible.

Future Artist-Makers also highlights how artist-makers from across Europe are critically engaging with the FabLab ethos of open-source design, creative collaboration and hardware hacking, and how the combination of ‘new machines, new materials and new networks’ are beginning to make their mark.

Curated by Declan Sheehan, Nerve Centre, with assistance
from Javier Garcia Buron, Director FabLab Limerick, School of Architecture, University of Limerick, and Gustavo Valera, Ultra-Lab Madrid. Check out the full list of what is on offer below.

#NEWPALMYRA (2015 - )

The ancient Syrian city of Palmyra was a vital crossroads of trade and culture, an archeological treasure that suffered a senseless destruction by ISIS. #NEWPALMYRA is an online community attempting to virtually reconstruct this cultural heritage under the Creative Commons Zero license, recreating Palmyra in virtual space and sharing the 3D models in the public domain, to carry the rich history of Palmyra forward to new generations. 

More Men Than Columbus (2016) - Paola Bernadelli (UK/IT)

In 1933, Italian fascist General Italo Balbo and his Italian Air Armada of 98 men were given a feted civic and public reception in Derry~Londonderry, a stop en-route in their pioneering seaplane journey from Rome to Chicago, an event designed to act as a highly visible display of a military power. This body of work explores these events as one uncomfortable narrative that has slipped unseen through the fabric of local, national, and international histories, challenging our willingness to redact or reimagine our past. Developed using digital laser-cutting tools in FabLab Nerve Centre.

Digital Veil (2016) - Aoife Brown (IRL)

One part of a planned four-part installation of digitally fabricated screens, an interpretation in 3D form of the ancient Celtic Five-Fold symbol, four circles in the shape of a cross, with a central circle inter-looping with the other four, speaking of themes of integration and inter-connectedness. Developed in FabLab Limerick using contemporary digital fabrication tools to engage with a heritage of iconography and design.

MonoLute (2016) - Ed Devane (IRL)

Part of ongoing research and experimentation into musical instrument design, education and digital fabrication. Designed to be able to produce just one note at a time on a single string (mono), and to be played within an ensemble of MonoLute players, collectively generating an audio drone effect. The MonoLute was developed in FabLab Limerick, bringing contemporary digital fabrication tools to an exploration of music design and heritage. 

Draw Rabby (2013 - ) - Ciara Finnegan (UK/NL)

A developing project exploring remote, multi-authored, collaborative story-telling through drawing and the generation of a record of these narratives. In the dynamic online visual story-telling platform Draw Rabby in Galleries One and Two (and online at http://drawrabby. tumblr.com) you are invited to draw on a shared canvas, responding to or in some way interacting with the other drawings present. The digital canvas is refreshed daily and its archive held online.

ReFunct Modular (2015 - ) - Benjamin Gaulon (FR)

A series of multimedia sculptures that (re)uses numerous ’obsolete’ electronic devices (digital and analogue media players and receivers). Those devices are hacked, misused and combined into a complex chain of elements. To use an ecological analogy they ‘interact’ in different symbiotic relationships such as mutualism, parasitism and commensalism, experimenting and exploring unchallenged possibilities of ‘obsolete’ electronic and digital media technologies and our relationship with technologies and consumption.

Sound Surface (2012 - 2014) - Jonathan Keep (UK)

Four vases and four sounds: Bird call, Godwit; jazz music, Herbie Hancock, Watermelon Man; classical music, Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue; classical music, Bach, Goldberg Variations BWV 988. Each vase is rst built virtually from the base up within digital 3D modelling software, adding the sound quality as a texture to the surface as the pot grows, produced by the volume and rhythm of a selected sound progressively spiralling up the form over the length of the sound clip. The resultant porcelain vase created from this virtual 3D shape is 3D printed directly in clay with a 3D printer that the artist has devised. Once printed the porcelain clay is red and glazed in a traditional manner.

Bilinski (2015) - Francesco Pacelli (IT)

One in a series of new 3D printed ceramics by the artist making
an historical connection between the contemporary fabrication methods of 3D printing and traditional ceramics crafts, made in collaboration with a traditional ceramics workshop in Faenza, Italy. The nal piece created combines both visible clues of contemporary digital fabrication, such as the layers created in the vertical building of digital 3D printing, alongside the opalescent aesthetic of the traditional ‘full re reduction’ glazing technique developed in the Renaissance period. 

Dsruptive (2015 - ) - Juan José Tara (ES)

Drawing from the philosophy of transhumanism and its belief that the integration between technology and humans will one day be absolute, the vision for the project Dsruptive is to research and fabricate implantable technology, producing technology for the human body, designing small and simple circuit boards to act as body implants with diverse features such as energy or memory. Research displayed here includes development of the rst ‘bio-payment’ in 2015, using both bitcoin and the physical implant of a computer chip under the skin to make digital transactions. 

The Transaction Project, blown glass in printed ceramics (2012 - 2014) - Unfold & Charles Stern (BE/UK)

At the core of the Transaction project is a technical innovation which addresses the compatibility issues between clay and glass. Few works successfully combine these materials in a hot state because clay and glass possess different rates of contraction and expansion. Working collaboratively, the artist researcher Charles Stern and the Antwerp-based design studio Unfold used digital fabrication tools to create an iterative process allowing for rapid testing of materials and form. Utilising 3D printing as a solution, the results are composite objects that possess the integrity of both handmade and digital skills, and new ways of making, manufacturing, appropriation and distributing in a digital age. 

Miniatures - Kits (2011 - 2013) - Cecile Babiole (FR)

Miniature 3D printed models of iconic cult musical and digital consumer objects – a Rickenbaker electric guitar, a Technics turntable, a video game console – are displayed in a shrine-like case. The work uses 3D printing as a technique to engage with the intimacy and ubiquity of cult music technology objects, their binary status as intrinsically personal but also massively replicated.

The mugs of eternal life (2013 - ) - Martin Boyle (UK/IRL)

From the series of projects Connections which appropriates and adapts the imagery created by individuals for social media and online commerce. An exploration of some repeated motifs of posing, props, expressions discovered in one speci c genre of self-portraits in online social media, drawing unexpected parallels from between such imagery and the pious facial expressions commonly used in portrait scenes featured on religious commercial souvenirs, prints and iconography. Developed and fabricated using digital laser-cutting tools at FabLab Belfast.

Draw Rabby (2013 - ) - Ciara Finnegan (UK/NL)

A developing project exploring remote, multi-authored, collaborative story-telling through drawing and the generation of a record of these narratives. In the dynamic online visual story-telling platform Draw Rabby in Galleries One and Two (and online at http://drawrabby. tumblr.com) you are invited to draw on a shared canvas, responding to or in some way interacting with the other drawings present. The digital canvas is refreshed daily and its archive held online.

Moving Type (2016) - Jiann Hughes (UK)

Using contemporary digital fabrication technology to make a reference to the major historic technological innovation that was the moveable type printing press, and an exploration of making meaning in language, using laser-cutting to both redact and deconstruct contemporary texts. Developed by the artist in a Future Artist-Maker Labs residency at UltraLab, Madrid. 

Thesaurus Anatomicus recut (2016) - Jiann Hughes (UK)

One of a series of works that engage with past technical innovations, this is a series of contemporary laser-cut replications of archival nineteenth century anatomical engravings. Engaging with a speci c historical approach to the body – the anatomical examination of its division and manipulation – this work brings contemporary digital technology to replicate works of archival image technology. Developed by the artist in a Future Artist-Maker Labs residency at UltraLab, Madrid.

The stuff of Additivism (2016), Retro t [prototype] (2016), No Donor Required (2016) -  Jiann Hughes (UK)

These works look at how additive processes will alter what it means for us to be human or post-human – challenging the boundaries
used to de ne and constrain human bodies, with the ability to be
a body made up of ‘organic’ internal organs and/or a plethora of arti cial 3D printed internal organs. Each 3D printed internal organ featured in the works is readily available as online digital code. Lying beneath these arti cial internal organs there lie the detritus of the 3D printing process, unused 3D printing lament, and the organic world scavenging amongst it. Developed by the artist in a Future Artist- Maker Labs residency at UltraLab, Madrid.

Loading/Unloading: nothing’s ever waste (2016), Hand Printing (2016), All that remains (2016) -  Jiann Hughes (UK)

Unlike the ‘subtractive’ process of engraving referred to in Thesaurus Anatomicus recut above, which creates an object by removing unwanted parts of a certain material, 3D printing an object is often referred to as an ‘additive’ process, creating an object by building it up in layers. The artist, however, was struck by the fact that even this additive 3D printing process still creates its own detritus, the seemingly random tangle of strands of unused 3D printing lament that seems to falls from any 3D printing job. In these works, the artist imagines the potential for creativity within that tangled detritus. Developed by the artist in a Future Artist-Maker Labs residency at UltraLab, Madrid.

The Modern Prometheus etching (2016) - Jiann Hughes (UK)

One single act of hand-turning the crank and playing the laser- etched vinyl collides the technologies of diverse ages: the historical ‘subtractive’ process of recording audio as data onto a surface like a vinyl LP, and the contemporary ‘additive’ process of encoding and replicating from digital code a 3D printed object such as a turntable; an archival hand-cranked motor and a digitally replicated device; the nineteenth century fear and the fascination for future technologies in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, recorded and reproduced both digitally and manually in the twenty- rst century.

Life’s a Beach (Art Imitates Life), gable end mural, Abercorn Rd, Derry, (2016) - Jim Ricks (IRL/USA)

A gable end mural on Abercorn Rd in Derry, Northern Ireland, painted on site. The mural uses looping linguistic plays and colourful visual devices to ask the public to good-naturedly re-imagine or revise the city’s history. This piece was executed utilising a new combination of freehand graf ti and digitally produced stenciling techniques. A work completed during a Future Artist-Maker Labs residency at FabLab Nerve Centre.

Michael Collin’s Nose (Job), proposal for the 2022–3 Centenary, (2016) - Jim Ricks (IRL/USA)

A 3D printed model. The statue of Michael Collins in Merrion Square in the centre of Dublin was recently removed. Just prior to its removal, his well rubbed bronze nose was digitally scanned, and made into an enlarged 3D printed model using a bronze lament. The idea of the piece is twofold. It looks to the nature of public art and the act of commemoration, highlighting the public’s want to rub the nose. In an exaggerated populist approach to public art, he ‘gives the people what they want’. And also it looks to the 1916 commemorations and the ongoing revisionism that is taking place, comparing it to plastic surgery, as the Republic ‘gets some work done’ on its own history. A work completed during a Future Artist- Maker Labs residency at FabLab Nerve Centre.

Last Sign of Occupy (2012 - 2016) - Jim Ricks (IRL/USA)

A digitally routered 6’4” high folding screen which accurately reproduces one of the last protest signs made by the Occupy Wall Street movement from Galway in May of 2012. The work is commemoration and plays off the ideas of obfuscation, transparency and illumination. A work completed during a Future Artist-Maker Labs residency at FabLab Nerve Centre.

‘Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone’ (2014 - 2016) - YoHa (UK)

New work re ecting on this artist-led socially engaged art and citizen science project, which set out to uncover and highlight local, situated knowledge about the changing ecological, social and industrial arena of the Thames estuary. Bringing an exploration of the use of digital fabrication tools to collaborations between artists, local ecologists, shermen, ex-industrialists, engineers, interest groups, and the general public in Southend and Leigh-on-Sea. 

 

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